Greater Athens, Georgia Information and Resources

Athens-Clark County, Georgia

Athens-Clarke County, comprised of 125 square miles, is the smallest in land area of Georgia’s 159 counties. It was the twenty-fifth county created in the state and is located approximately 65 miles NE of Atlanta.

As of the census of 2000, there were 101,489 people, 39,706 households, and 19,694 families residing in the county. The 2005 Census Estimate shows a population of 104,429. Its county seat is Athens, Georgia, with which it is a consolidated city-county. The Athens-Clarke County is the principal city of and is included in the Athens-Clarke County, Georgia Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Jackson County, Georgia

Jackson County, Georgia

With excellent schools, nine small towns and rural unincorporated communities literally minutes from the urban amenities of Atlanta and pre-eminent research institutions in the city of Athens; with ancient Appalachian mountains and rivers and lakes, Jackson County is a community like no other.

The population in 2000 was 41,589. Explosive growth is evident with a population of 52,292 in the 2005 Census estimates. This makes Jackson County the fastest growing county in the Athens Metro.

Madison County, Georgia

Madison County, Georgia

Madison and Oglethorpe counties share Watson Mill Bridge State Park, the site of the longest covered bridge in Georgia. The bridge, which is over 100 years old, spans 229 feet of the South Fork of the Broad River. There are also facilities for camping, hiking trails, picnicking and fishing in the park.

As of the census of 2000, there were 25,730 people, 9,800 households, and 7,330 families residing in the county. The 2005 Census Estimate shows a population of 27,289. The county seat is Danielsville, Georgia. Madison County is included in the Athens-Clarke County, Georgia Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Oconee County, Georgia

Oconee County, Georgia

Oconee County citizens have always had a strong sense of community. The quality of life in Oconee County is unusual – It has pastoral rural areas; it is located adjacent to a world class State University (UGA) and has a road network leading to all areas of the state. The information in this section will help you to better understand the uniqueness of Oconee County and what the county has to offer its citizens.

As of the censusĀ² of 2000, there were 26,225 people, 9,051 households, and 7,322 families residing in the county. Census estimates for 2005 show a population of 29,748. The county seat is Watkinsville, Georgia. Oconee County is included in the Athens-Clarke County, Georgia Metropolitan Statistical Area. Progressive Farmer rated Oconee County as third best in the list of 2006 “Best Places to Live” in the U.S., one of two places to place in the top ten two years in a row.

Oglethorpe County, Georgia

Ogelthorpe County, Georgia

Oglethorpe County was created in 1793. Georgia’s 19th county is named for the state’s founder, General James E. Oglethorpe. Lexington, the county seat, is named in honor of the Revolutionary War battle. The largest city is Crawford, named for William H. Crawford, former Governor, U.S. Senator, Secretary of the Treasury and Minister to France.

As of the census2 of 2000, there were 12,635 people, 4,849 households, and 3,539 families residing in the county. The 2005 Census Estimate shows a population of 13,609. The county seat is Lexington, Georgia.